Episode 104: African American Cinema / The Post

Paul Robeson in The Emperor Jones (1933)

Paul Robeson in The Emperor Jones (1933)

Description

On the first segment of today’s show, host Tom Breen is joined by New Haven film critic and lecturer Steve Fortes to talk about the history of African American cinema.

In the early 1990s, Steve taught two seminars at Yale University about the history of African American film and television. On today’s show we’ll talk with Steve about the films that he covered in those two seminars, what he saw as some of the prevailing themes and trends of in the first century of African American cinema, and about which movies and filmmakers he would include today if he were teaching the same course in 2018.

On the second segment of the show, Breen is joined by New Haven Independent staff writer Allan Appel for a review of THE POST, Steven Spielberg’s new movie about the 1971 debate within the editorial ranks of The Washington Post about whether or not to publish Daniel Ellsberg’s Pentagon Papers, classified documents that revealed decades of executive branch deceit and cynicism that prolonged America’s disastrous involvement in the Vietnam War. We’ll talk about how this movie resonates in 2018 as a celebration of the free press, and as an indictment of the hypermasculine industries of newspapers and politics in the early 1970s.

Episode 103: Best Movies of 2017

LADY BIRD (2017)

LADY BIRD (2017)

Description

On today's episode, host Tom Breen is joined by New Haven movie blogger Dan Heaton and Madison Art Cinemas owner Arnold Gorlick to talk through their top 10 movies of 2017. The episode also features over a dozen voicemails from friends, listeners, and former guests on the show with their picks for the best of the year.

Episode 102: Francescsa Andre / The Shape of Water

CHARCOAL (2017)

CHARCOAL (2017)

Description

On the first segment of today’s episode, host Tom Breen is joined by Bridgeport-based filmmaker Francesca Andre to talk about her new movie “Charcoal,” a short film about colorism and prejudices within and without the black community against dark skin. They talk about the origins of this movie, Andre’s background as a fashion and news photographer, and her own experiences with colorism in her native Haiti and here in the States.

On the second segment of the show, Breen joined by New Haven Independent reporter Allan Appel for a review of The Shape of Water, director Guillermo del Toro’s new sci-fi-horror-romance about a mute cleaning woman in early 60s Baltimore who falls in love with an amphibious man held captive at the secret US army research facility where she works.

Links

http://www.francescaandrephotography.com/

 

Episode 101: Kate Rushin / Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST (1991)

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST (1991)

Description

On the first segment of today’s show, host Tom Breen is joined by Connecticut poet Kate Rushin to talk about two movies that have had a profound influence on her understanding and love of cinema: DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST, a landmark 1991 drama from director Julie Dash about three generations of African American Gullah women from the Sea Islands of South Carolina, a movie often celebrated as the first feature film directed by an African American woman to get a wide theatrical release in the United States; and we’ll also talk about BLACK ORPHEUS, a 1959 musical from French director Marcel Camus that adapts the classical Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice to the vibrant, samba-suffused streets of Brazil’s Rio de Janeiro during Carnival.

On the second segment of the show, Breen and the New Haven Independent’s Allan Appel review THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI, a new ensemble dramedy from director Martin McDonagh that follows a grieving, defiant mother seeking justice for her murdered child in a small town in the Ozark mountains of southern Missouri.

Links

Kate Rushin's website: http://katerushinpoet.com/

Episode 100: Steven Spielberg's Amistad (1997)

One panel of the Amistad Memorial, designed by Ed Hamilton, that stands outside of New Haven's City Hall. (Photo by Thomas Breen)

One panel of the Amistad Memorial, designed by Ed Hamilton, that stands outside of New Haven's City Hall. (Photo by Thomas Breen)

Description

This marks the 20th anniversary of Steven Spielberg’s AMISTAD, a 1997 historical drama about a successful revolt among enslaved Africans aboard a Cuban slave ship in 1839, those Africans’ subsequent recapture and detention in, among other places, New Haven, Connecticut, and the subsequent landmark United States court cases that resulted in the Africans’ freedom. 

On today’s episode, host Tom Breen talks with Yale Film Studies Center director Michael Kerbel, Gilder Lehrman Center postdoctoral associate Joseph Yannielli and local film critic and lecturer Steve Fortes about Spielberg’s take on the Amistad uprising and trials, how themovie holds up two decades after its initial release, and how it resonates for audiences in New Haven where this story is so widely celebrated as one of this city’s primary connections to an international history of anti-slavery and civil rights.

Links

Treasures from the Yale Film Archive screening of AMISTAD: http://calendar.yale.edu/cal/event/eventView.do?b=de&calPath=%2Fpublic%2Fcals%2FMainCal&guid=CAL-ff808081-5e1b392f-015e-3451c399-000079e4bedework@yale.edu&recurrenceId=

New Haven Independent article about Marcus Rediker's documentary GHOSTS OF AMISTAD: http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/a_peoples_history_of_the_amistad/ 

Joseph Yannielli's talk on "“The Mendi Mission and the African Rehearsal for Reconstruction”": http://calendar.yale.edu/cal/event/eventView.do?b=de&calPath=%2Fpublic%2Fcals%2FMainCal&guid=CAL-ff808081-5e1b392f-015e-3946e364-00000183bedework@yale.edu&recurrenceId=

Episode 99: Mark Oppenheimer / Lady Bird

Mark Oppenheimer at the WNHH Studio.

Mark Oppenheimer at the WNHH Studio.

Description

Today’s West Coast, High School, Romantic Comedy edition of the show all about a few movies that explore the highs, lows and confused in-betweens of teenage life, mostly told from the perspective of young female protagonists.

On the first segment of the show, host Tom Breen is joined by New Haven-based author, journalist and podcaster Mark Oppenheimer to talk about two movies that have had a profound influence on his understanding and love of cinema: Amy Heckerling’s 1982 directorial debut FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH, an ensemble high school sex comedy set in southern california and written by Cameron Crowe, and Crowe’s own 1989 directorial debut SAY ANYTHING, which brings the teenage romantic yearning up the coast to Seattle and follows one unlikely couple in the tumultuous summer after their high school graduation.

On the second segment of the show, Breen is joined by New Haven Arts Paper editor Lucy Gellman and New Haven Independent staff writer Allan Appel to talk about LADY BIRD, Greta Gerwig’s new movie (also a directorial debut) about a 17-year-old in Sacramento, California trying to figure out who she is in relation to her mom, school, friends and city, all of which she desperately longs to escape from in order to start a new life as an independent adult on the East Coast.

Links

Mark Oppenheimer's website: http://www.markoppenheimer.com/

Unorthodox the podcast: http://www.tabletmag.com/tag/unorthodox

Facebook Live video of the interview: https://www.facebook.com/NewHavenIndependent/videos/10155885885571228/

Episode 98: Gorman Bechard / Who Is Lydia Loveless?

Gorman Bechard at the WNHH studio.

Gorman Bechard at the WNHH studio.

Description

On today's episode, host Tom Breen talks with prolific New Haven filmmaker Gorman Bechard about his latest rock documentary, Who Is Lydia Loveless? The movie follows a 24-year-old country rock musician as she tours the midwest in the early stages of her career, and dives deep on the challenges and joys of making art for a living. 

Links

What Were We Thinking Films website: http://whatwerewethinkingfilms.com/

Episode 97: 2017 Latino and Iberian Film Festival at Yale (LIFFY)

Latin American filmmakers come to town for LIFFY. From left to right: Juan Gomez, Carlos Barba Salva, Luis Alberto García, Deyma D’Atri, and Jean Jean.

Latin American filmmakers come to town for LIFFY. From left to right: Juan Gomez, Carlos Barba Salva, Luis Alberto García, Deyma D’Atri, and Jean Jean.

Description

This week is the Latino and Iberian Film Festival at Yale (LIFFY), an annual celebration of contemporary Spanish and Portueguese-language cinema that takes place in downtown New Haven at the Whitney Humanities Center at 53 Wall St.

In this week's episode, host Tom Breen talks with a handful of filmmakers who have movies screenings at this year's festival, including Cuban filmmaker Carlos Barba Salva, Haitian/Dominican filmmaker Jean Jean, Cuban filmmaker Deyma D’Atri, Cuban actor Luis Alberto García, and Colombian filmmaker Claudia Fischer.

Links

http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/film_fest_brings_latin_american_directors_to_town/

Episode 96: Trans Awareness Week / A Prophet

IV Staklo and Patrick Dunn

IV Staklo and Patrick Dunn

Description

Next week is Transgender Awareness Week, an annual grassroots celebration of trans culture and concerns that takes place in different communities throughout the country, including in New Haven.

The first segment of this episode is all about a trans film series that the New Haven Pride Center has organized to help celebrate Trans Awareness Week in the Elm City. Host Tom Breen is joined in the studio by two of the series’ programmers, Patrick Dunn and IV Staklo, to talk about the movies that will be playing, the different ways that trans people and issues are represented on screen, and the current state of the New Haven’s trans rights community.

On the second segment of the show, Breen joined by the Yale Film Study Center’s Archer Neilson to talk about Un prophete, a 2009 French film by Jacques Audiard that stars Tahar Rahim as a French Arab man learning to navigate the different languages, economies, cultures, and politics of a central French prison in the early 2000s. Un prophete is playing this Sunday at the Whitney Humanities Center on Wall Street as part of the Treasures from the Yale Film Archives series.

Other Links

New Haven Pride Center Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/NewHavenPrideCenter/

New Haven Trans Awareness Week schedule: http://hosted-p0.vresp.com/713637/e3ad37a1d9/ARCHIVE

Episode 95: Loving Vincent / Nasty Women

Description

On the first segment of today’s show, host Tom Breen talks with Allan Appel and Lucy Gellman about LOVING VINCENT, a new animated film from directors Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman that gives the Citizen Kane treatment to the life of Dutch post-impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh: through a series of flashbacks and second-hand stories, we see the rise and fall of the troubled and inspired life of this eccentric painter, focusing in on the final days of his life in the rural French town of Auvers.

Unlike most animated movies, this story is composed of tens of thousands of hand-drawn oil paintings by over one hundred contributing artists, all simulating the heavy brushstrokes and ebullient style of the movie’s namesake.

On the second segment of the show, Breen is joined by Lucy McClure, Debbie Hesse, and Trish Clark to talk about the Nasty Women Film Event, a screening night of locally made feminist films that will be taking place at the Ely Center of Contemporary Art on Election day, next Tuesday, in honor of, or in defiance of, the anniversary of Donald Trump’s election as president.

Other Links

Nasty Women Film Event Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1962381047383269/

Episode 94: Joe Fay / George A. Romero and Tobe Hooper

George A. Romero's KNIGHTRIDERS (1981)

George A. Romero's KNIGHTRIDERS (1981)

Description

Halloween is just around the corner, and so, on today’s episode, host Tom Breen bis joined by horror-flick aficionado Joe Fay to talk about the movies, styles, and legacies of two seminal horror filmmakers who both died in 2017: George A. Romero and Tobe Hooper.

But instead of retreading the familiar territory of these two directors’ best known and most influential works, Romero’s 1968 Night of the Living Dead and Hooper’s 1974 The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Joe and Tom focus on two slightly deeper cuts, Romero’s 1981 Arthurian biker drama Knightriders and Hooper’s 1985 alien vampire flick Lifeforce.

Episode 93: Home Movie Day 2017 / Film Preservation

Description

It’s mid-October, which means that it’s just about time for Home Movie Day, an annual celebration of amateur films and filmmakers that takes place at the New Haven Museum this Saturday, October 21st, from noon to 4 p.m.

On today’s show, host Tom Breen is joined by Yale film archivists Brian Meacham and Molly Wheeler, who are the organizers of the New Haven instance of this international event, as well as by Yale University Art Gallery museum staffer Rachel Mihalko.

The four dive into the actual work itself that film and media archivists do: what are the tools and materials they work with, what are the challenges they encounter and the solutions they provide, and what is the broader social value of film and media preservation in the 21st century.

Links

Home Movie Day 2017 New Haven Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/140235409919658

Episode 92: Blade Runner 2049

Blade Runner 2049 (2017)

Blade Runner 2049 (2017)

Description

On today’s review only episode of the show, host Tom Breen is joined by New Haven Independent reporter Allan Appel to talk about Blade Runner 2049, the new sci-fi-film-noir from director Denis Villeneuve that offers another look at the dystopian American future of uncanny androids and commercialized urban decay originally envisioned by Ridley Scott’s 1982 film Blade Runner.

Episode 91: Battle of the Sexes / Columbus

BATTLE OF THE SEXES (2017)

BATTLE OF THE SEXES (2017)

Description

On today's review only episode of the show, host Tom Breen is joined by New Haven Independent reporter Allan Appel to talk about two new movies about young women torn between social expectation and personal ambition, who find both distraction and clarity in the art that consumes their lives.

THE BATTLE OF THE SEXES, the latest feature from directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Ferris, tells the story of a 1973 tennis match between 29-year-old tennis star Billie Jean King (played by Emma Stone) and aging tennis veteran and self-proclaimed 'chauvinist pig' Bobby Riggs (played by Steve Carrell).

And COLUMBUS, the directorial debut of filmmaker Kogonada, is an indie romance featuring a recent high school grad (played by Haley Lu Richardson) who is trying to understand just what exactly moves her so much about the many examples of high modernist architecture that exist in her otherwise unassuming, small Midwestern hometown of Columbus, Indiana.

Episode 90: 2017 Toronto International Film Festival

Description

On today’s episode of the show, host Tom Breen is joined by Madison Art Cinemas’ founder and owner Arnold Gorlick to talk about their experiences at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, which ran from September 7th to September 17th and featured almost 340 movies, many of which were making their world premieres.

Episode 89: Graphic Novel Adaptations / American Splendor

AMERICAN SPLENDOR (2003)

AMERICAN SPLENDOR (2003)

Description

In today's episode, host Tom Breen is joined by New Haven Review publisher Bennett Graff for a conversation about movie adaptations of graphic novels. In particular, they focus on AMERICAN SPLENDOR, a 2003 film from directors Shari Springer Brown and Robert Pulcini that brings to life Cleveland author Harvey Pekar’s decades-spanning autobiographical underground comic series of the same name.

Episode 88: Wind River

WIND RIVER (2017) by Taylor Sheridan

WIND RIVER (2017) by Taylor Sheridan

Description

On today's review only episode of the show, host Tom Breen and New Haven Independent reporter Allan Appel talk about WIND RIVER, a new murder mystery from writer-director Taylor Sheridan, whose previous screenwriting credits include SICARIO and HELL OR HIGH WATER, that takes place in a desolate, unforgiving stretch of the Wind River Northern Arapaho Reservation in western Wyoming.

Episode 87: Lady Macbeth

LADY MACBETH (2016)

LADY MACBETH (2016)

Description

On today’s review-only episode of the show, host Tom Breen is joined by New Haven Independent reporter Allan Appel for a discussion of Lady Macbeth, a new British film from director William Oldroyd about a young bride in 19th century northern England who chafes against the oppressive boredom, disrespect, and objectification of being a kept woman in a patriarchal society. As the movie’s title indicates, though, our young protagonist is not one to be content with a life of humiliation and immobility, and, once she finds an object of her own desire, she is willing to go to some pretty extreme lengths to attain it.

Episode 86: Dunkirk

Christopher Nolan's Dunkirk (2017)

Christopher Nolan's Dunkirk (2017)

Description

On today's review-only episode of the show, I'll be joined by New Haven Independent staff reporter Allan Appel to talk about DUNKIRK, Christopher Nolan's new WWII action movie about the mass evacuation of hundreds of thousands of British troops from the beaches of a besieged French coastal city in the early summer of 1940. We'll talk about this movie's vision of courage, despair, and victory in defeat, as well as about how it compares to other landmark works in the WWII movie genre.

48 Hour Film Project New Haven

Note

Thursday, July 20, 2017 - Due to a technical error, we accidentally deleted the recording of today's interview with with Trish Clark and Patrick Whalen about the 48 Hour Film Project New Haven. Fortunately, we've had Trish on the show before to talk about the 48 HFP... all the way back on Episode 1! Listen to the interview linked above to hear about the 2015 competition, and click on any one of the links below to learn more about this year's competition.

Links

http://www.48hourfilm.com/new-haven-ct

https://www.facebook.com/48HourFilmProjectNewHaven/